Ellen Page courageously comes out

COMMENTARY BY
KAREN MENNELLA

Actress Ellen Page, who is best known for her roles in the movies “Juno” and “Inception,” made a moving speech Friday for a Human Rights Campaign event.
Page shared with the world that she is gay. Forbes staff writer Dorothy Pomerantz praises this courage in her recent article, “Why Ellen Page Coming Out Matters In Hollywood.”
“Hollywood needs more Ellen Pages,” Pomerantz said.
Page is part of an inspirational chain of celebrities and athletes who have decided to be honest about how they feel. She has become part of a group of strong people who are deciding to be themselves regardless of others’ opinions. This matters because it lets people know that it is perfectly okay to be true to who they are.
While being openly gay or lesbian is more common in modern society, it is unfortunately true that it can sometimes result in discrimination in the workplace. Pomerantz mentions in her article that such judgment could be an issue for Page during future castings.
I firmly believe that who somebody loves should not affect his or her career. I am not automatically more qualified for a job just because I am attracted to those of the opposite sex. Deciding whether people are eligible for a position based on who they love is absurd; it should not be a factor in the hiring process. Everyone is allowed to love whomever he or she wants to.
If Page is qualified for the role, she deserves to get it.  And that goes for anyone with anything — you do not have to be a celebrity. If you have the talent and skills required for a job, whom you love should not affect your chances of being hired.
It is simple. If you are qualified for a position, then you are qualified. Who you love, how much you weigh, how tall you are, what religion you practice or what you believe in should not matter.
Page’s honesty shows people it is perfectly okay and important for them to be who they really are. This is something the world needs to embrace more often regardless of whether it is because of sexual orientation, race, economic status, religious practices, ethnicity or gender.
Seattle Seahawk player Malcolm Smith tweeted in response to NFL prospect Michael Sam admitting he was gay.
“It takes courage to change the culture,” Smith said.
Indeed, it is the courage of people like Page and other brave souls who challenge stereotypical societal views that contributes to making a meaningful difference. So if Page being herself is another step in inspiring more people to be themselves too, then Pomerantz is right.
The world — including Hollywood — needs more Ellen Pages.

contact the writer:
karen.mennella@scranton.edu

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *