Sweet treats prove harmful to dogs

JILL GARZON
ADVERTISING MANAGER

It is common knowledge among most dog owners that chocolate is not good for their dogs. Chocolate, aka a favorite snack for most humans, can cause some serious issues for owners’ little companions, including vomiting, diarrhea, extreme agitation, seizures and dangerously high blood pressure.

All of these outcomes, however, depend on how much the dog has actually consumed and the size of the dog.
According to a New York Times article,
“For a 20-pound dog, 9 ounces of milk chocolate can cause seizures, these seizures do not stop.”

The article emphasized immediate medical attention if these seizures occur.  The kind of chocolate also matters. Dark chocolate is higher in toxicity than regular or milk chocolate, so if the same dog from the example above ate dark chocolate it would only take 1.5 ounces until the seizures started. The size of the dog matters because the smaller the size of the dog, the less chocolate they can consume without being harmed. Larger dogs might still show symptoms after consuming a sizable amount,  so the size of the dog should not deter owners from taking action.

So what should we do about this? Be sure to keep chocolate away from low spaces where dogs could easily access it. Feed your dog regularly; dogs will not eat unless they are hungry, but once they start eating they have difficulties controlling their food intake. This could cause them to inhale more food at a faster rate than we do, so feeding at regularly scheduled times can also help keep them away from your secret stash.

Have some general knowledge about how much chocolate you have in your home. This way if they do end up getting into the chocolate, you can take action if you think they have eaten too much. Lastly, be aware of other food items your dog cannot eat. Beware of grapes, raisins, and sugarless gum as well. We all love our dogs and they make us happy, so keep them safe from the delicious snacks that they love as much as we do.

contact the writer:
jill.garzon@scranton.edu

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