TBTN: Giving a voice to voiceless

COMMENTARY BY
SARAH MUELLER

As our campus prepares for Take Back the Night (TBTN) April 24, I find myself constantly in awe of how responsive The University community is.

TBTN is a national rally to end sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. Everyone is given an opportunity to share their stories and show their support for those affected by violence.

At The University, our theme for the 24th annual TBTN is “Remembering our Roots, Growing our Branches.” In my opinion, this theme allows those affected by violence in any way to reflect on their experiences and grow from what they endured. Rather than focusing on the negative aftermath of their experiences, this theme provides victims with a positive means to cope with their traumatic experiences. Additionally, this theme gives supporters a way to help victims find strength in themselves to persevere forward.

Rallies such as TBTN are vital to the healing process for many victims of violence. Public demonstrations that promote advocacy and acceptance help those affected by violence mend significantly.

Veronica Roth writes in her novel, “Allegiant,” “I have always known this: Life damages us, every one. We can’t escape that damage. But now, I am also learning this: We can be mended. We mend each other.”

This quote gives life to the meaning of TBTN. Look around you. So many of us have been impacted by violence. Perhaps you know a victim. Perhaps you are a victim. Regardless, as human beings, we are called to mend each other. That is exactly what TBTN intends to do: to mend us in ways we never knew we needed to mend and to advocate for those victims who cannot heal on their own.

TBTN serves as a voice for the voiceless. It empowers those who lost their voices to violence.

Contact the writer:
sarah.mueller@scranton.edu

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