Holi Festival kick-starts spring

COMMENTARY BY
MARY BAURKOT

To celebrate the change into the spring weather, the Holi Festival, also known as The Festival of Colors, is held every year.

My adventurous cousin informed me about the festival years ago. She showed me pictures and videos of thousands of people running around and throwing colored powder at each other. I was taken by the beautiful colors everywhere and immediately added the festival to my bucket list.

I fortunately got the chance to participate in a mini version of the festival held here at The University. My friends and I decided to go at the last minute. We threw on old clothes that we did not mind getting ruined and walked down to the Dionne Green. In true Scranton fashion, once we arrived we first got in line to get a free T-shirt. They were white with black writing and were perfect for wearing during the color fight. We then got in another line to try some Indian food. I put a little bit of everything on my plate and tried it all. Some of it was a bit too spicy for me, but overall I really liked all of the food. While we ate, a man spoke to us about the Indian culture and told us a little bit of information about the festival itself.

It was then finally time to get out to the Green and get our colored powder. Once we were all armed with our colors, we waited for the countdown. When the countdown reached its end, there was madness all around me. People were throwing the powder everywhere. In the beginning it was a little bit hard to breathe and see, but eventually everyone got used to it and the war began. People were throwing the powder left and right. The powder eventually ran out and the event slowly fizzled out.

I was so happy that I went to the event. It was so fun and carefree. The only thing that was regrettable about the festival was that after I showered and blow-dried my hair, I realized that the colored powder dyed parts of my hair green. It turns out that the color is particularly hard to get out of blonde, color-treated hair, a fact that I wish I was informed of before the festival. I am currently still rocking the green ombr├ęd look and hope that it will fade out soon, because I am far too cheap to get my hair done again. Although my hair is now fifty shades of green, the event truly solidified my desire to actually go to India one day and experience the real festival myself. I can only imagine how much more amazing the festival would be to experience in the actual country it came from.

Contact the writer:
mary.baurkot@scranton.edu

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