Education majors urged to take coaching minor

JOHN J. O’MALLEY, Ph.D., pictured above, teaches psychology The University. He believes a coaching minor can make education majors stand out. Photo by The Aquinas / Emma Black

JOHN J. O’MALLEY, Ph.D., pictured above, teaches psychology The University. He believes a coaching minor can make education majors stand out. Photo by The Aquinas / Emma Black

With the job market for education majors being so competitive, John J. O’Malley, Ph.D., suggests that a coaching minor can help them set themselves apart from other candidates.
O’Malley, professor emeritus of pyschology at The University, said a minor in coaching is a great way to set yourself apart and diversify yourself with coaching.
“If you want to teach, coach,” O’Malley said.
O’Malley believes that because sports are so important to our society, coaches need to be trained well and prepared to take on such a heavy responsibility.
“We need to make sure that our coaches are trained properly. Coaching isn’t just knowing how to play the game. Coaching is much more complex than just that,” O’Malley said.
The University has courses to prepare students for the responsibility that comes along with being a coach.
Students who take Physical Education 160: Coaching Principals will receive certification from the American Sports Education Program, which is a necessary requirement for being a coach in nearly every state, O’Malley said.
“The class was designed to teach students every aspect of coaching. Gary N. Wodder teaches the philosophy and administrative aspects of the course. Thomas D. Evans, former swim coach at the University of Scranton, teaches the conditioning and first aid for the course. I teach the psychology aspects of coaching,” O’Malley said.
If students are interested in setting themselves apart from other education majors, there is a coaching workshop presented by Positive Coaching Alliance from 5 p.m. – 6:40 p.m. Oct. 22 in the Long Center. The workshop is free of charge for students, parents and faculty associated with The University.
“In addition to the workshop, the Positive Coaching Alliance has a great, interactive website that students who are interested in the coaching minor should visit,” O’Malley said.
Along with the Positive Coaching Alliance site, O’Malley encouraged anyone interested in the coaching minor to visit www.sportscharacter.org and learn about the Bochicchio Sports Character Initiative.
According to the site, the Bochicchio Sports Initiative is a group of educators, coaches and athletic administrators in Northeastern Pennsylvania.
Since its inception in 2007, more than 1,500 coaches, administrators and student athletes have been trained.
“We’re very proud of the site and what it works to do,” O’Malley said.
By Joe Evans
News Correspondent

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