New music program starting on campus

Courtesy of Monicapearce.com MONICA PEARCE is a  composer of new classical/contemporary music. She will premiere her new work Oct. 30 at The University.

Courtesy of Monicapearce.com
MONICA PEARCE is a composer of new classical/contemporary music. She will premiere her new work Oct. 30 at The University.

Kayla Shea
Arts & Life

The lecture series “Conversations on Music,” led by Professor Anthony Marasco, will begin Nov. 6.

“Interactive Music: Blurring the Line Between Audience and Artist” will focus on the absence of musical rules so that the title “musician” becomes more general. Marasco describes these changes and the direction they will possibly take.

“This basic approach to – what if music had no rules? And what if we allowed people, or anybody, to perform this music because it had no rules? What if you didn’t have to be a trained musician to perform music?” Marasco questioned.

Guest composer Monica Pearce will demonstrate her musical creations and will premiere her new work at the lecture. Pearce is one of the many composers beginning to view music in this light. A composer himself, Marasco thoughtfully considered how music is perceived and the potential in opening the doors to different sounds “or anything that’s against the grain, so to say.”

“There are so many musical things that are just like classical composers or typical composers would write – the only problem is that not just one person is making those decisions. The benefit to this is that, as opposed to sitting down at the piano and playing what Mozart wrote for you to play, you’re just playing and whatever the result is – is the result, and there’s a beauty in that I think because you’re not figuring out right or wrong, you know? Too much, I think, in music boils down to a wrong note or a right note,” Marasco said. “I think it is extremely more expressive.”

Music theory involves more than what some expect. With chords, intervals and more involved, there are rules to follow when composing. It takes a strong understanding of music theory to be able to create a desired sound and this new direction in music may allow more people to enjoy music.

“We can make our music more and more and more complex, or we can start opening up the doors so to say and make music that is open to things that we have no control,” Marasco said. “That’s the real core of this – looking at what else can music be aside from a symphony or a pop song or a jazz tune. What else can music be?”

Come check out the new lecture series “Conversations on Music” at 7 p.m. Nov. 6. In the Pearn Auditorium, Brennan Hall (228).

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