Boeing to shut down plant

Courtesy of Wiikimedia Commons Boeing C-17’s fly in formation. These are like those that were produced by Beoing from the southern Califonria production facility. Whether the plant will still be used is still up in the air.

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Boeing C-17’s fly in formation. These are like those that were produced by Beoing from the southern Califonria production facility. Whether the plant will still be used is still up in the air.

WILL HORN
Business Editor

Boeing Aviation has been a staple of the aerospace industry for years. However, Boeing is now planning to shut down one of its longest-running plants on the West Coast. The C-17 military plane was meant to carry 82 tons of cargo in its 170-foot-long fuselage. The United States military has relied heavily on Boeing for these planes.

Boeing has been happy to supply them; however, Boeing decided that it was in its best interest to phase out production due to the reduction in defense spending throughout the world.

The plan to stop producing these planes has now led to the closing of one of the last major aerospace factories that once dominated the western part of the country. The factory’s 2,200 workers will all be phased out, most of whom will either retire or be moved to other plants. Another 800 workers will also be laid off due to the shutdown of the plant.

Boeing has secured buyers for all but five of the planes still set to be produced from the factory. The Wall Street Journal states that the company is “confident of selling the five jets yet to secure buyers.” They also stated that “it is still deciding what to do with the factory site itself.”

The plant is located near Los Angeles. It was originally used to produce B-17 bombers and MD-80 jetliners. The plant was opened in 1941 by the Douglas Aircraft Co., which was eventually acquired by Boeing in the late 1990s.

A major step Boeing has taken already is to auction off the machinery used in the production of the planes. This machinery is highly complex and designed especially for the creation of the C-17, but Boeing believes that it will have no trouble securing a buyer because the machinery can be repurposed to help with the production of other planes.

The auction for this machinery started in April and will continue until June 23. After that, Boeing will continue to produce planes from other plants around the country.

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