Scranton school district strikes

Courtesy of Wiikimedia Commons Teachers take to picket lines in order to draw more attention to their cause. By doing so, they have forced the Scranton School District to address their concerns.

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / Teachers take to picket lines in order to draw more attention to their cause. By doing so, they have forced the Scranton School District to address their concerns.

Published: October 2, 2015

WILL HORN
Business Editor

Teachers in the city of Scranton have decided that they will go on strike after negotiations with the county and school board have fallen through. The Scranton school district shut down Monday with teachers taking to the picket lines. The reason behind this strike is to fight the county’s attempts to cut salaries while increasing class sizes. Currently, the Scranton school district has 10,000 students with roughly 900 hundred teachers.

“I can understand their frustration and I know they’re trying to get their point across but I don’t think it should be at the expense of children,” said Emily Carpenter, a junior health administration major. This is what most parents who use the Scranton public school system must be feeling right now, because they also just want the best education for their children.

Negotiations broke down back in August, when the teachers were asked to wait until the winter to get annual raises. Normally, these wages are applied before the school year begins. The strike has affected a total of 16 schools. Since the strike, some sports teams have tried to continue their practices even without coaches, facilities or equipment.

“It shows that the students are very dedicated and don’t want to be negatively affected by what is going on with the faculty,” said Jessica Wenke, a junior communication major.

This strike has come at a very similar time to The University teachers’ negotiations with the administration. The students at The University had some ideas of alternatives that could be adopted by the school district instead of cancelling school entirely.

“My high school teachers refuse to offer help as an alternative to canceling school entirely. The kids are still in classes, but it also discourages them from going the extra mile if they can’t go in for extra help,” said Carpenter.

This is a similar strategy to that put into effect by the teachers at The University who have resorted to limited office hours.

Wenke disagreed with Carpenter’s opinion saying that “the teachers should voice their concerns and strike on their own time to prevent alter the students education.”

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