Contest calls for student videos about spirituality, technology

Published: February 25, 2016

MICHAEL MAZZUCA
Staff Writer

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary is encouraging young adults to briefly become Steven Spielbergs.

The Borromeo Seminary is presenting the inaugural John Cardinal Foley Award in Social Communication to the winner of a video competition addressing Pope Francis’s message for World Communications Day.

Francis’ message, which can be found online, states, “it is not the technology which determines whether or not communication is authentic, but rather the human heart and our capacity to use wisely the means at our disposal.”

Participants must be 18 to 25 years old.

Former John Cardinal Foley Chair of Homiletics & Social Communications, Reverend Thomas F. Dailey, O.S.F.S. emailed Cathy Seymour in the Office of Campus Ministries.

“I don’t know her personally, but I know her position,” Dailey said in a recent phone interview. “We promoted the video competition to every Catholic college and university in Pennsylvania and elsewhere.”

Though it has been a while since a Royal has succeeded in video competitions, Professor Mary Beth Holmes of the communication department supports participation.

“You see how you match up against students in other schools. Also, you can get recognition in a national competition like this.”

Students have placed second and third in contests. Last year, a University student earned an honorable mention.

“Money isn’t the reason you do it,” Holmes said with a smile referring to competitions.

Videos must be between 30 and 90 seconds. Producers can work individually or in groups as long as one person is identified as the group leader. All entries will be simultaneously uploaded to the Seminary’s YouTube channel and be voted on by viewers via likes.

The video receiving the highest number of likes will be the winner. Content deemed inappropriate will eliminate videos from competition. All approved videos will be uploaded beginning April 1.

Dailey expects this to be an annual competition.

“Even people who are not participating in this competition, we certainly hope that people will look at them, rate them, like them. Anyone can participate in the competition even if you are not producing the video,” Dailey explained.

It is not how many views a video receives that determines the winner, but the number of likes.

Contact the writer: michael.mazzuca@scranton.edu

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