Irish ambassador to speak on campus

Published: February 25, 2016

WILL GORMAN
News Correspondent

Assisted reporting by: Kayla Shea

COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY’S WEBSITE / His Excellency David Donoghue, Irish ambassador to the U.N., was co-facilitator with His Excellency Macharia Kamau, Kenyan ambassador to the U.N., for negotiations that led to a sustainable development agenda adopted in September, 2015. Donoghue will address the global importance of sustainable development in the McIlhenney Ballroom 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.

COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY’S WEBSITE / His Excellency David Donoghue, Irish ambassador to the U.N., was co-facilitator with His Excellency Macharia Kamau, Kenyan ambassador to the U.N., for negotiations that led to a sustainable development agenda adopted in September, 2015. Donoghue will address the global importance of sustainable development in the McIlhenney Ballroom 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Scranton will welcome one of the most involved figures in global development and sustainability — Ireland’s ambassador to the United Nations, His Excellency David Donoghue — 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the McIlhenney Ballroom in the DeNaples Center.

The University is known to be an advocate for human rights and global issues. Julie Schumacher Cohen, the director of community and government relations, expressed her excitement for the event in a recent interview.

“His work on poverty is something that is close to our hearts,” she said.

Scranton students have a full history of involvement in peace and social justice.

At the event, Donoghue will be outlining his recent involvement in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

He and His Excellency Macharia Kamau, Kenya’s ambassador to the U.N., co-facilitated negotiations that led to a set of goals that would replace the “Millennium Development” goals, stretching from 2000 to 2015.

Donoghue claimed that this new set of goals will be more modernized objectives extending until 2030.

“This new set is far wider than the last,” he said in a phone interview. “It covers the eradication of poverty, the preservation of the planet, including climate change, and also creating conditions for balanced economic growth around the world.”

As difficult and immense as these problems seem, Donoghue said there are things that college students can do, including sharing the news about the agenda. If more people are aware of and support the objectives set forth by the U.N., the more likely that worldwide poverty will decline while environmental preservation and economic growth will continue to rise, he said.

However, Donoghue explains that merely having the goals in place is not enough.

“Having spent all last year simply agreeing on (the agenda), now we want to demonstrate that the world is taking them seriously,” Donoghue said.

Contact the writer: william.gorman@scranton.edu

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