Review: The 1975 satisfies in new album

Published: March 3, 2016

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS /THE 1975 pleases fans in new album “I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware of It.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS /THE 1975 pleases fans in new album “I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware of It.”

JESSIE ESTRELLA
Staff Writer

The 1975 released their album, “I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware of It,” on Feb. 26. The album is the group’s second album, three years after releasing debut title album.

“I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware Of It,” marks the group’s obvious aesthetic change – both a shift in color scheme, sound and message. On June 1, 2015 the group revealed their new color aesthetic, causing a frenzy of surprise, shock and excitement among fans. For years, the group has been recognizable for their grungy look and lyrics – priding themselves on their ability to deliver with simplicity; their music videos, album art, and live performances were adorned in black and white.

Upon listening to the new album on repeat over the weekend, I have come to the conclusion that their new sound is definitely worth the listen. As an avid fan of The 1975’s work, I have to admit, I was a bit nervous to hear their new sound. Would they be completely abandoning their grungy sound and look? How drastic would their change be?

Initially, The 1975’s aesthetic revamp was shocking: pink and white. But it was nice to see a light change. To be lifted up from a dark abyss, to light. Not that the abyss wasn’t lovely while down there, but to finally see the light in their music is fantastic.

Their new aesthetic is a direct reflection of their new album. The shift from dark to light, to me, indicates that they have grown; grown away from their old sound of angst and petty sadness, a popular sound for grungy, indie bands in 2012, to an 80’s funk sound, with feelings of acceptance of the past and moving forward.

A key difference I’ve found with this album is its progressive sound, moving toward a change. Whereas the last album was stagnant, matching the black and white aesthetic The 1975 were emulating. Their major shift in sound is pleasant, going from indie rock to sounds that mimic that of Prince and The Revolution: ultra funky beats, progressive tempos and hymnal qualities.

A prime example of that shift in sound is the intro track on the album, titled “The 1975.” That same intro track was also on their debut album, however it was a much different sound.

The intro track on their first album was dark and heavy. However to go along with the revamp of their sound and aesthetic, “The 1975” was tweaked by adding a choir in the background, creating an uplifting tone, as if inviting listeners to progress with them. The 1975 makes sure their album thrusts listeners straight into their new sound, with their first single off the album, “Love Me.” “Love Me” integrates sound from 80s funk with the bands usual grungy guitar.

Their song, “A Change of Heart,” which seems to answer and contradict many of the lyrics from their first album, sounds like a song that would be played in any typical 80s school dance. Songs like those of the band The Cure. The new album also includes a couple instrumentals, and plenty of saxophone: an instrument The 1975 only tinkered with once on their previous album.

All in all, T he 1975’s new album is definitely worth testing, whether you like their new look and sound, or the old look and sound or even if you have never heard of them.

Contact the writer: jessica.estrella@scranton.edu

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