Album review: Wussy’s ‘Forever Sounds’

Published: April 7, 2016

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / ALTERNATIVE BAND Wussy released their newest album “Forever Sounds” in March, fronted by singer-songwriters Chuck Cleaver and Lisa Walker.

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / ALTERNATIVE BAND Wussy released their newest album “Forever Sounds” in March, fronted by singer-songwriters Chuck Cleaver and Lisa Walker.

PETER SHAVER
Staff Writer

In March, Cincinnati-based band Wussy released their latest album, “Forever Sounds” through Shake It Records.

Fronted by experienced singer-songwriters Chuck Cleaver and Lisa Walker, the five-piece band has steadily released music and honed its sound throughout the past decade.

An eclectic group, they make melodic music influenced by Americana and noisy guitar-rock, claiming on their Bandcamp page to be attempting to “bridge the gap between the Band and Sonic Youth.”

Their albums are always adventurous and often include a mix of ragged soft and loud songs, with Cleaver and Walker switching off on lead vocals.

Their latest album is the group’s most enamored record with shoegaze and heavy, layered guitar noise.

The sound spanning “Forever Sounds” ten tracks is dense and alternatively jagged and dreamy.

The band considers it a culmination of their previous output and the sound Cleaver and Walker have been aiming toward since they first formed the band.

While all of Wussy’s previous records have presented a full and complete sound, on this record, the band sounds particularly strong and cohesively operating.

Songs include the spacy and distant opener “Dropping Houses;” the band members have referred to this as a song that they are particularly fond of.

There is also the aggressive “She’s Killed Hundreds,” which includes desperate vocals and lyrics. “Hello, I’m a Ghost” laments a past relationship and is another album highlight.

“Forever Sounds” comes to a close with “My Parade,” ending the album on a quieter and more hopeful note. Lyrically the band touches on many topics, from death and relationships to an expansion on a scene from “The Big Lebowski” in “Donny’s Death Scene.”

Many of these are well-worn song subjects for the band, but the members continually present them in impressive, new ways.

However, despite the songwriting pair’s excellent lyrics, the focus stays on the music.

“Forever Sounds” is an exciting album, which, like Wussy’s past records, takes a new and interesting direction while retaining the signature sound that the band has developed and improved upon throughout their career.

Contact the writer: peter.shaver@scranton.edu

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